The writer Rabai Al- Madhoun  welcomes you to a site dedicated to his writing as a journalist and novelist  has spent more than thirty years in the feild of writing. This is the place for you.  Here you'll find information about The writer, his work, Books, and critics written By others, specially reviews to his first novel "The Lady from Tel Aviv", published by The arab Institution for Research and Studies" in Beirut-Lebanon. and other books writtin by him 
 
 

The Lady from Tel Aviv
The Taste of Seperation
The Palestinian Uprising
Wrtter &  journalist  ـــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــ

The Lady from Tel Aviv
 

 

By Rabai Al-Madhoun

(Beirut: al-Mu’assasa al-‘Arabiyya li-l-dirasat wa-l-nashr, 2009).

 


 

The Lady from Tel Aviv is one of the great achievements of modern Arabic literature, an ambitious novel with many genre guises. It is partly a poetic thriller, partly an exploration of nostalgia and lost family history, partly a meditation on the nature of fiction itself, and always a reflection on Palestinian identity and exile. Throughout, it is a novel within a novel within a novel and a modern literary classic—on par with Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun or Jabra Ibrahim Jabra’s Search for Walid Masoud—that tells one of the most compelling human stories to ever come from modern Palestine.

 

 


Synopsis

 

In the economy class of a plane bound for Tel Aviv, the lives of two passengers intersect. Palestinian novelist Waleed Dahman is returning home for the first time in decades. Armed with a freshly-minted British passport, Waleed will land in Israel, then cross into the Gaza Strip where for the first time in 38 years, he will see his mother, cousins, and childhood friends. There, he will also be gathering material for his new novel that tells the story of Adel al-Basheety—a Palestinian exile returning to Gaza for the first time in decades in the hopes of reuniting with the love of his life, Laila, from whom he was separated by the 1967 war.

 

Sitting next to Waleed is Dana Ahova, a famous actress flying home to Jewish Tel Aviv with her spirits crushed and personal life in a tailspin. Her boyfriend—the son of an Arab dictator—has just stood her up and disappeared without a trace, and now she fears for her own life. Desperate for consolation, she begins to tell Waleed about her life. In the process, both she and Waleed share a little more than they originally bargain for. By the time she realizes that Waleed was a friend of an old fiancé, Danna’s apprehensions have returned full force. Listening to her convoluted stories, Waleed also begins to suspect that her presence next to him is not an accident—perhaps she works for Mossad?

 

As the night sky hurtles past Waleed and Dana, the course of their lives begins to change. She effectively reshapes the novel he is working on and suggests a title, One House, Two Shadows. As that novel within the novel changes, so too does the relationship between the author, Waleed, and his imaginary protagonist, Adel Basheety. By the time Waleed arrives in Gaza, he seems no more real—and no less imaginary—than the character in his fiction.

 

The Lady from Tel Aviv is one of the great achievements of modern Arabic literature, an ambitious novel with many genre guises. It is partly a poetic thriller, partly an exploration of nostalgia and lost family history, partly a meditation on the nature of fiction itself, and always a reflection on Palestinian identity and exile. Throughout, it is a novel within a novel within a novel and a modern literary classic—on par with Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun or Jabra Ibrahim Jabra’s Search for Walid Masoud—that tells one of the most compelling human stories to ever come from modern Palestine.

 

 

 


 International recognition for The Lady from Tel Aviv

 

—Shortlisted as one of the six finalists for 2010 IPAF (Arabic Booker) Prize.

 

“In The Lady from Tel Aviv, Raba’i Madhoun tackles the Arab/Palestinian-Israeli issue, focusing on a pivotal time of anxiety and suspicion, with tensions on the point of boiling over. The novel’s protagonists are Palestinian exile Waleed Dahman, who is returning home to Gaza after many years in Europe, and Israeli Dana Ahova, who happens to be sitting next to him on their flight into Ben-Gurion Airport. Their dialogue takes the reader into the far realms of memory, history and the self. The Lady from Tel Aviv is a novel that, in its complexity, intricacy and ambiguity, avoids the dogma of ready-made ideology.”


IPAF (International Arabic Prize)

 

http://www.arabicfiction.org/en/shortlist.html

 

—Reviewed dozens of times in all the major Arabic newspapers and literary journals.  

 

“Rabai Al-Madhoun’s novel will take you the height of reading pleasure. It’s a story that will grab you and open up worlds composed of gratifying, lovely characters.”

 

Elias Khoury, al-Quds al-Arabi (http://www.alquds.co.uk/index.asp?fname=2009%5C07%5C07-14%5C13qpt98.htm&storytitle=ff%D9%85%D8%AA%D8%B9%D8%A9%20%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D8%B1%D8%AF%20%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AA%D9%85%D8%B1%D9%8A%D9%86%20%D8%A7%D9%84%D8)

 

“One of the most powerful and mature novels to come from the new exile.”

 

Salah Fadl, al-Ahram (http://www.ahram.org.eg/64/2010/02/01/10/5642.aspx)

 

“If you were able to forget for a moment its modern appearance, you might think you were reading a story from the 1001 Nights… This novel is filled of delight and heart-breaking scenes. Reading it is a real pleasure.”

 

Amir al-Tahiri, al-Sharq al-Awsat (http://www.aawsat.com/details.asp?section=19&issueno=11181&article=526738&search=ربعي%20المدهون&state=true).

 

 

Published in May, 2009, the novel is now in its forth edition.



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